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People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. Welcome to From On High.

Monday, December 29, 2008

What Are They Teaching At Radford?

Or should I say: What are they smoking at Radford?

I tossed my morning wheaties when I read this letter to the editor of the Roanoke Times from a "professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Radford University," curiously entitled, "Obama could shape the Supreme Court" (which deserves a resounding duh):

"In the 1996, 2000 and 2004 elections, the court consisted of three conservative justices, four moderate justices and two swing votes -- Justices Anthony Kennedy and Sandra Day O'Connor."

A joke, right? He's got to be joking.

Let's see:

• There are nine justices total.
• We can all agree that two of them (Kennedy and O'Connor) were considered (more often than not) swing votes (which means both held firmly to legal opinions grounded in New York Times headlines).
• And Rehnquist, Scalia, and Thomas were/are certainly conservative.
• That's five.
• That leaves four.

So Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stevens, Souter, and Breyer were ... moderates?

In which planetary dimension?

But the learned professor, with his years of education and research behind him, says it's so:
The two oldest members now are Stevens (88) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (75), members of the moderate bloc. Although David Souter (69 and another moderate) is three years younger than Antonin Scalia and ... [blah blah blah]
Okay, I've read enough.

This professor is a nut.

Nobody this side of Neptune would put any of those three in the "moderate" bloc unless he was suffering from dementia or was harboring a liberal bias powerful enough to prevent an attachment to the realities of this world.

Ginsburg and Souter are moderates? Please. I'm eating my breakfast.

Muslims Are No Different From The Rest Of Us

Explosives-Laden SUV Kills 14 Afghan Schoolchildren

Someone Want To Wake Webb Up?

I read this kind of thing each day and want to just hide under a rug:
As the world begins to unwind, people stop buying things. Sales of imported wine and toys and clothes drop, along with purchases of imported and domestic-made cars. GM and Ford totter on the verge of bankruptcy, dragged down by their bloated domestic union contracts which suck up all the profits made by their booming overseas divisions. Now their overseas divisions are slowing down too. Even mighty Toyota is crashing.

Worse, no cash is available -- especially from the terrified banks -- to build new modern plants and assembly lines.

By then, US unemployment will have reached 12% and your 401K plan will be renamed the 101K plan (except for members of the auto workers union whose own retirement plans will be bailed out by taxpayers money in exchange for their votes).

Eventually, when the whole sorry mess crashes down around us ... [link]
The prospects are horrifying in their implications.

So what is the man we Virginians elected to protect us from harm doing about it?
Webb Sets His Sights On Prison Reform
By Sandhya Somashekhar, Washington Post Staff Writer

This spring, [Senator James] Webb (D-Va.) plans to introduce legislation on a long-standing passion of his: reforming the U.S. prison system. Jails teem with young black men who later struggle to rejoin society, he says. Drug addicts and the mentally ill take up cells that would be better used for violent criminals. And politicians have failed to address this costly problem for fear of being labeled "soft on crime."

In speeches and in a book that devotes a chapter to prison issues, Webb describes a U.S. prison system that is deeply flawed in how it targets, punishes and releases those identified as criminals. [link]
So the world is going to hell in a hand basket and James Webb comes to the rescue by ... calling for prison reform.

Prison reform.

I suppose it's a step up from that famous quote of his that got him elected - "Iraq ... bad."

But prison reform in a time when the world teeters on the brink of economic ruin?

For the love of God, would someone beat knots on this guy's head until he comes back to Earth?

Santa Claus Returns With More Gifts

If it weren't Obama, I'd say it couldn't be done.

Combine today's headline ...

Obama team vows to deliver tax cuts

... with this previous headline:

Barack Obama reveals stimulus package that could exceed $1 trillion

... and this:

Obama announces budget director, pledges to reduce deficit

Skyrocketing spending, a fat tax cut, and he's going to reduce the deficit too!

Stupid, delusional, or just a really good liar? I'll let you decide. (Oh, wait, you already have.)

How's That Hawaii Vacation Going, Barack?

Soon enough, pal. Soon enough ...

Gaza Crisis Is Another Challenge for Obama, Who Defers to Bush for Now

In a matter of days, this kid's résumé will actually have some honest-to-God work experience on it. Obama may, in those same few days, wish it didn't.

Play time's over, Junior. Time to show us what you got.

How Has This Escaped My Reading?

Rather shocking, if there's a grain of truth to it:
The Theodore Roosevelt Administration was a time of tumult that offers many parallels to our own. We'd do well to think more about those parallels. But such thinking needn't be accompanied by adulation for an egomaniacal weirdo who was as close to being a psycopath as anyone who ever occupied the Oval Office.
This wasn't written by some wild-eyed lefty blogger in his mother's basement. It came from a senior writer at The Weekly Standard. Interesting.

- - -

"Egomaniacal weirdo." Can a comparison between TR and Bill Clinton be drawn?

That's Cruel, Man

Caroline Kennedy is getting pounded unmercifully now:

Woman who’s never worked: I’ll work twice as hard

And more:

Camelot must be Gaelic for chutzpah.

Ouch.