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People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. Welcome to From On High.

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Like I Said.

There is no way a legitimate liberal Democrat is going to challenge a black president in the 2012 Democratic primary.  No way.

As a liberal black columnist for the Washington Post puts it this morning:
Warning: If the Democratic left does to Obama in 2012 what it did to incumbent President Carter in 1980 via Ted Kennedy's damaging Democratic presidential primary challenge ... the Democratic party as a whole will find itself paying a steep price for years to come.

That's a promise, not a threat.

Sabotage the nation's first black president and the Democratic Party might as well bid farewell to its most loyal base of supporters: African Americans.
That little threat - or promise - comes from a black Democrat. The first of many to issue such an ultimatum.

As I put it two days ago:
What Democrat would go up against a black president who is still wildly popular amongst the most loyal constituency the Democratic Party has? A constituency with a perpetual chip on its shoulder and an ever growing list of grievances that go unrequited. And a memory that lasts for centuries.

If Al Sharpton has a problem with Rush Limbaugh, just watch what he'll do with any white boy who challenges his main man.

It ain't gonna happen. 
It ain't gonna happen.

Well, So Much For Republicans Bringing Change To Washington

America is doomed:


She was a Tea Party babe.

Now she's quickly become nothing more than another slimy Washington politician.

For the love of God.

It's Slowly Dawning On Them

When you argue that consensual sex between two adults is none of our business, then you shouldn't be shocked or upset when adults have consensual sex.  And you should wonder why anyone would be arrested for it.

See "Professor David Epstein charged with incest with his daughter."

And if you are shocked by it, then you need to get your arms around the fact that the Supreme Court has already sanctioned it.

See "A Columbia professor is arrested for incest — but isn't there a constitutional right to incest between consenting adults?"

As well as a constitutional right to polygamy, for that matter.

And why would the Court arbitrarily limit this new-found "fundamental right" to adults?  And only to consensual sex?  Isn't a fundamental right to sex a fundamental right to sex?  Where once there was a line ...

Justice Scalia warned us that we would head down this path.

Rape?  Pedophilia?  Will they find some fundamental right to engage in those practices soon?  If they were to be consistent, they'd have to.

Get Out Pencil and Paper

This is certainly interesting:
The Matter Of Wrap-Cooking A Country Ham
By Barnie Day

This is the world’s best way to cook a country ham. Guaranteed. Period. Scout’s honor. Cross my heart and hope to die. And it’s not original. Of course, I stole it. And, as luck would have it, it is also the easiest. Often the case. We overcomplicate a lot of things. Cooking a ham is one of them.

Let’s start with the ham itself, and how it was cured.

There are lots of run-of-the-mill brands, some of them old and famous but still run-of-the-mill, brands that owe their reputations more to glossy catalogues and clever and expensive marketing campaigns than they do to judge-by-eating juries.

Many of these hams are cured “inside out,” needle-embalmed with nitrate injections. They are not the best hams—often more expensive—but not the best.

Still, these hams eat okay—unless you’ve eaten ham cured like your granddaddy cured it, ham cured the old way.

He cured his hams “outside in.” He didn’t know about nitrate injections. (And if he had, he wouldn’t have done it to his hams!) He simply packed his fresh in plain salt for six to eight weeks, took them up, washed and dried them, maybe smoked them a little, maybe not, probably peppered them, hung them in cotton sacking in a cool place, out of reach of the dogs, and aged them for several months.

A note here: don’t be flummoxed by the term “sugar cured.” Often salt is mixed with sugar, with pepper, with molasses, with honey—all kinds of stuff—and labeled some fancy “cure,” or another, but these things—including smoke—be it apple wood, hickory, whatever—only flavor hams. What cures, or preserves, a ham is the salt that it absorbs during the curing process.

Buy whatever brand you want. For my money, the best country ham in this part of the world, the one closest to what your granddaddy cured, is a Clifty Farm ham, processed for 60 years or so by the Murphey Family, in Paris, Tennessee. They’re usually available, and reasonably priced, across Southside Virginia around Christmastime. ($1.79 a pound at the Piggly Wiggly in Danville.)

Okay, now let’s cook that bad boy!

Unwrap the ham and wash it. Yeah, they all have a little mold. No big deal. Really. It would cause me some concern if it didn’t have mold on it. Just palm it off with a little warm water. Two minutes, tops.

Put the ham in a pot that you have a top for. I always have to cut the hock off so it will fit the pot I use. They’ll cut the hock off for you at the grocery store. If I have to tell you what that hock is good for, stop reading this and move on. You got no business with a country ham. Either that, or you’re a Yankee, and threw the ham out when you saw the mold.

Fill the pot with water until the ham is covered with 3-4 inches, put the top on, and bring it to a boil.

Now here is the trick to this: As soon as it begins to boil, you take it off the stove. That’s right. Off the stove when it begins to boil. Set it somewhere where it will be out of your way.

Now we’re going to wrap that puppy up. Pot and all. You can use most anything—towels, an old blanket, a quilt, a sleeping bag. The patio lounge cushion works well. That’s what I use. The idea is to insulate the pot so that it holds the heat.

I put an inch or so of newspaper under the pot, the same amount on top, wrap the patio cushion around it, and tie the cushion in place with baling twine. This doesn’t take five minutes. Just make sure it’s insulated good.

When you get it wrapped, leave it alone. Walk away from it. Forget about it for 12 hours. Just let it sit.

After 12 hours, remove the wrap, and take the ham out of the pot and put it on a baking pan. Careful here—even after sitting 12 hours, the water will be too hot for you to put your hands in.

Trim the skin off, score a diamond pattern on the thin layer of encasing fat, rub into it a cup of white sugar, put the ham—uncovered—in the oven and bake it for 2 hours at 275 degrees. And that’s it. You’re done. Let it cool before slicing.

Merry Christmas. And best to you and yourn--BKD
Another reason why I love Christmas.