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People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. Welcome to From On High.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

ObamaCare's Cost Starting To Be Tallied

"We agree on reforms that will finally reduce the costs of health care. Families will save on their premiums; businesses that will see their costs rise if we do nothing will save money now and in the future. This plan will strengthen Medicare and extend the life of that program. And because it gets rid of the waste and inefficiencies in our health care system, this will be the largest deficit reduction plan in over a decade."
-- Barack Obama, December 15, 2009 --

You were warned then that it was all a lie.

It was a lie:
ObamaCare's Real Cost
By Michael Barone, Investor's Business Daily

How much will ObamaCare — call it the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act if you like — cost over the next 10 years?

More than you've been led to believe, reports Charles Blahous of George Mason University's Mercatus Center. To be specific, he projects it will add $1,160 billion to net federal spending over the next 10 years and at least $340 billion to federal budget deficits in that time.

Why does he say ObamaCare will increase spending when the Obama administration, citing Congressional Budget Office numbers, promised it will save money?

One reason is that the CBO said ObamaCare's "Class Act" provisions would save money, since the government would collect premiums immediately but not pay off policyholders until later.

But Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has conceded that the Class Act is unworkable, and so Blahous zeroes out those phantom savings.

Another reason ObamaCare was supposed to save money is that it raises the Medicare tax 0.9% for high earners. It then dedicates those resources both to Medicare and to general revenues, with the CBO counting the savings twice.

That's because under a 1985 internal ruling (not a full-fledged law passed by Congress), the CBO scores the costs of legislation against a hypothetical baseline rather than against current law.

But, as Sebelius conceded to Congress in March 2011, that's double counting. The government can't spend the same money twice. Medicare tax revenues dedicated to current Medicare spending can't be used to reduce the budget deficit. That's true "in practice," Medicare chief actuary Richard Foster wrote last year, despite the CBO's scoring procedure. And, as Blahous points out, if the funds don't go to Medicare, then under current law, Medicare will go broke faster and be forced to reduce benefits. Since Congress is not likely to let that happen any sooner than it has to, the deficit reduction promised by the CBO score and claimed by the Obama administration simply ain't going to happen, no how, no way. [link]
ObamaCare, if it's not repealed, will bankrupt this country.

It's time we started asking, what should be done with those who did this to us?