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People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. Welcome to From On High.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Appeals Court To The Coalfields: Drop Dead

As if it weren't bad enough that the federal EPA's war on coal is moving forward so rapidly, and so brazenly.  And if it weren't bad enough that the excuse being foisted upon the working families of Southwest Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia, and beyond who will soon be on Obama's ever-growing food stamp program because the EPA is using the now-discredited "global warming" excuse to do it, our court system has given its sanction:
Court Gives A Green Light To The Imperial EPA
Investor's Business Daily editorial

For those who have tracked the efforts of the Environmental Protection Agency to clamp down on carbon dioxide emissions, this week's news from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia will come as no surprise.

Back in 2007, the Supreme Court told the EPA to regulate CO2 as a pollutant. A three-judge panel at the appeals court reaffirmed those marching orders when it gave the EPA the go-ahead to limit new coal-fired power plants.

The only real difference between then and now is in the EPA's attitude. Five years ago, under the Bush administration, it was a reluctant warrior and had to be prodded by the court. Now it's gung-ho.

It is using all the power it can squeeze out of the 1970 Clean Air Act to phase out the burning of coal. The panel's unanimous decision gave it the green light it wanted. The prospects of a successful appeal — which would require the Supreme Court to reverse itself — look dim.

Under the law, the EPA has to find that CO2 — not by itself but as a cause of climate change — is a threat to public health, safety and welfare. It does this by citing predictions from computer models.

The debates over these are legion, and there's nothing laypeople can add to them at this point. But the agency also needs to address the broader impact of what it proposes, and here the discussion seems to have been cut off before its time.

In its Regulatory Impact Analysis for the power plant rule, the EPA says the regulation is not an "economically significant rule." That might come as news to the coal mining industry, since the rule would probably bar the building of new coal-fired plants for the next eight years at least. [link]
A scorched earth policy intended to destroy the economies of coal producing states has no "economic significance." Come tell it to the children of the coalfields, you swine.

Thousands of families are to be thrown out of work because a bogus environmental theory is more important to do-gooders in Washington than is the well-being of the citizenry of this country.

My God.